Movilidad Urbana: Una cuestión de derechos

Tendencias y retos sobre la gestión de movilidad urbana.

La planificación y el diseño urbano para garantizar acceso y cercanía.

La movilidad es lo que más va a cambiar las ciudades en el futuro. Como nos movemos; como paseamos; como vamos al trabajo. Los mayores desafíos a los que se enfrentan las ciudades hoy en día también están relacionados con ese aspecto: moverse.

Y es que el tráfico está paralizando las ciudades.

Leer I   –   Leer II

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Posted in Urban mobility | Tagged

Networked Urbanism: Social Capital in the City

Despite considerable interest in social capital amongst urban policymakers and academics alike, there is currently little direct focus on its urban dimensions. In this volume leading urban researchers from the Netherlands, the UK, the USA, Australia, Italy and France explore the nature of social networks and the significance of voluntary associations for contemporary urban life.

Networked Urbanism recognizes that there is currently a sense of crisis in the cohesion of the city which has led to public attempts to encourage networking and the fostering of ‘social capital’. However, the contributors collectively demonstrate how new kinds of ‘networked urbanism’ associated with ghettoization, suburbanization, and segregation have broken from the kind of textured urban communities that existed in the past. This has generated new forms of exclusionary social capital, which fail to significantly resolve the problems of poor residents, whilst strengthening the position of the advantaged.

Grounded in theoretical reflection and empirical research, Networked Urbanism will be of interest to scholars and students of sociology, geography, and urban studies, as well as to policymakers.

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Posted in Cities, Networked society, Social capital, Social network, Urbanization | Tagged , , , , ,

Global Cooperation depends on the strength of Local Connections

The story of humanity is one of extraordinary cooperation but also terrible conflict. We come together to build cities, civilizations, and cultures, but we also destroy these through violence against each other and degradation of our environment. Given that human nature is capable of both extremes, how can we design societies and institutions that help to bring out our better, more cooperative, instincts?

This question is not limited to humans. Life’s domains are replete with many forms of cooperation, from microbes sharing helpful molecules to dolphins providing aid to the injured. This kind of ‘altruistic’ behavior – helping others at one’s own expense – presents an evolutionary puzzle. As Charles Darwin put it in The Descent of Man (1871): ‘He who was ready to sacrifice his life … rather than betray his comrades, would often leave no offspring to inherit his noble nature.’ The question then becomes, what kinds of conditions lead to the evolution of cooperative behavior when we would normally expect selfishness to prevail?

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Posted in Connections, Cooperation, Local | Tagged , ,

Why the future of social change belongs to community research

People don’t exist as isolated entities, and social programs, movements, or data analytic methods that assume they do are not aligned with reality—and may be doomed to fail. We all know that providing therapy or tutoring to a child may be less effective than hoped if the child’s parents, peers, school, and neighborhood are not also operating in a way that’s conducive to the child’s growth and well-being. Yet too often, we pass social policies or create interventions that are targeted only at the individual level. In a culture that overemphasizes the individual, community research draws on truths that are frequently ignored.

Community Psychology is probably one of the more complex fields in the social sciences because it embraces multiple levels of influence rather than simple individual differences.

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Read also: Handbook of Methodological Approaches to Community-based Research

Handbook of Community-Based Participatory Research

Posted in Community, Community change, Research, Research methods | Tagged , , ,

Handbook of Mutual, Co-Operative, and Co-Owned Business

The Oxford Handbook of Mutuals and Co-Owned Business investigates all types of ‘member owned’ organizations, whether consumer cooperatives, agricultural and producer cooperatives, worker cooperatives, mutual building societies, friendly societies, credit unions, solidarity organizations, mutual insurance companies, or employee-owned companies. Such organizations can be owned by their consumers, the producers, or the employees – whether through single-stakeholder or multi-stakeholder ownership. This complex set of organizations is named differently across countries: from ‘mutual’ in the UK, to ‘solidarity cooperatives’ in Latin America. In some countries, such organizations are not even officially recognized and thus lack a specific denomination. For the sake of clarity, this Handbook will refer to member-owned organizations to encompass the variety of non-investor-owned organizations, and in the national case study chapters the terms used will be those most widely employed in that country. These alternative corporate forms have emerged in a variety of economic sectors in almost all advanced economies since the time of the industrial revolution and the development of capitalism, through the subsequent creation and dominance of the limited liability company. Until recently, these organizations were generally regarded as a rather marginal component of the economy. However, over the past few years, member-owned organizations have come to be seen in some countries, at least, as potentially attractive in light of their ability to tackle various economic and social concerns, and their relative resilience during the financial and economic crises of 2007-2013.

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Posted in Co-Owned, Cooperatives, Social organization, Solidarity cooperatives | Tagged , , ,

Pas de devoirs en Lycée pro

Enseignante en économie gestion en lycée professionnel au Lycée des Métiers Jean Caillaud à Ruelle sur Touvre depuis 10 ans, j’ai débuté ma carrière (14 ans à ce jour) en MFR (Maisons Familiales et Rurales) puis suis passée par un centre de formation des apprentis. J’ai aussi enseigné l’anglais en collège pendant deux ans avant de choisir d’enseigner l’économie gestion.

Je n’ai jamais donné de devoirs à la maison à mes élèves, qu’il s’agisse des apprentis, des collégiens ou bien maintenant de mes lycéens. Ne pas donner de devoirs à mes apprentis me semblait une évidence car leur semaine de travail est déjà assez chargée. Même si leur temps de formation est moins conséquent qu’en lycée, je ne voyais pas vraiment comment ils auraient pu s’organiser pour travailler en plus à la maison !

Lire

Posted in Homework, Schools | Tagged ,

French moms aren’t superior parents—they just have it easier

The world has long been plagued by the myth of French women. We can’t seem to get enough of what makes them so effortlessly beautiful, impossibly fashionable, and perfect in every way. Reverence for la femme française is on high, now that France has elected a pro-female president who wants to engage the world, not insult it, to tackle climate change, not question its existence, and who sees women for who they are, not what they look like. Add best baby makers to the list of France’s accolades: French women are the most prolific baby producers in Western Europe, recent data show. While Danes have to try and lure couples to hotels with special deals to spark procreation, French women are producing nearly two kids—1.96 to be exact—per mother, which is just shy of the magical number needed (2.1) to keep its population steady. That compares to 1.35 in Italy and 1.7 in Denmark.

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Posted in France, Mothers | Tagged ,

Networked Urbanism: Social Capital in the City

Despite considerable interest in social capital amongst urban policy makers and academics alike, there is currently little direct focus on its urban dimensions. In this volume leading urban researchers from the Netherlands, the UK, the USA, Australia, Italy and France explore the nature of social networks and the significance of voluntary associations for contemporary urban life. Networked Urbanism recognizes that there is currently a sense of crisis in the cohesion of the city which has led to public attempts to encourage networking and the fostering of ‘social capital’. However, the contributors collectively demonstrate how new kinds of ‘networked urbanism’ associated with ghettoization, suburbanization, and segregation have broken from the kind of textured urban communities that existed in the past. This has generated new forms of exclusionary social capital, which fail to significantly resolve the problems of poor residents, whilst strengthening the position of the advantaged. Grounded in theoretical reflection and empirical research, Networked Urbanism will be of interest to scholars and students of sociology, geography, and urban studies, as well as to policy makers.

Read

Posted in Cities, Social capital, Social network, Urban | Tagged , , ,

Making cities wiser – Crowdsourcing for better decisions

The need in urban planning to make knowledge-driven decisions has spurred the creation of new solutions to gather and utilize insight from residents. Participatory planning has often been realized through workshops and during face-to-face encounters, but little of the knowledge gathered in these situations is of use in further urban planning and city development. New technological innovations, such as map-based public participation tools, support gathering information that matters and makes cities wiser. Interaction with citizens not only creates information, but supports also learning and innovation building, and creates trusts.

Technological innovations like Maptionnaire help gather information that makes cities wiser. Maptionnaire is a leading solution for collecting, analyzing and discussing resident insight on a map. With the help of Maptionnaire, various cities have been able to change their modus operandi. Through these learning processes actors from different sectors of the city are brought together to create joint understanding of the possibilities of public participation. Cities have started to value and use resident input as an equally important part of its knowledge base for planning. There is a great potential for more efficient use of participatory tools to make processes smoother and to save money. Future development work is needed to further facilitate knowledge transfer from residents to the use of planners and other city officials.

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Posted in Cities | Tagged

Algo va mal con las Smart Cities

En realidad, tras el concepto de Smart City no se escondería nada novedoso sino, más bien, otro ejemplo de la transformación que han sufrido nuestras ciudades tras la finalización de los cincuenta años de capitalismo embridado posteriores a la Segunda Guerra Mundial. Una apuesta firme por aquello que los holandeses han venido en denominar, eufemísticamente, sociedad participativa, y que no viene a ser otra cosa que el paso de la consideración de las ciudades como espacios para la reproducción de la vida y la sociabilidad humana, a espacios de inversión y consumo. De esta forma, las ciudades son hoy día áreas para la extracción de rentas, ya sea a través del mercado del suelo, la privatización de los servicios públicos con el establecimiento de nuevos y constantes copagos en los mismos, o la puesta en marcha de novedosos servicios que no suponen más que una nueva forma de liberalización encubierta.

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Posted in Smart city | Tagged